An Historic Seven Days of Record Cold – Main Stream Media ignores it

3782 record lows in just seven days! “Records haven’t merely been ‘broken’, they’ve been utterly obliterated.”

These numbers will increase over the coming days, as data from this month’s historic Arctic outbreak continue to roll in — but as it stands, from Oct 20 to Oct 26 the Unites States set a total of 3,782 new LOW temperature records vs just the 518 max.

This feat is even more impressive when you consider that the data is coming from NOAA, an agency with a “checkered” warm-mongering past to say the least, and one that routinely ignores the key component propping up what’s left of the global warming theory: the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect.

Over the past 7 days, a whopping 3,434 new DAILY low temp records were set (vs the 517 max)234 new MONTHLY low temp records fell (vs just the 1 max), and a staggering 114 ALL-TIME low temp records were toppled (vs 0 for max).

Moreover, records haven’t merely been “broken”, they’ve been utterly obliterated. As NWS meteorologist Corby Dickerson said recently: “It’s not normal to set this many records in this short of a time – and monumental records … It’s truly remarkable. There’s no other way to describe it.”

For decades it has been hammered into us that extreme cold events and severe snowstorms will be “a thing of the past”, that a steadily warming world will see the back of recording breaking lows and all time heavy snows.

Over the past 7 Days, the United States broke 3,782 Low Temperature Records vs just the 518 Max

Thanks to Laurel and Kenneth Lund for this link

 

 


8 thoughts on “An Historic Seven Days of Record Cold – Main Stream Media ignores it”

  1. Despite the cold records being set every day, the climate change crowd is pushing harder at sending things into our atmosphere to block the sun’s rays.

    They say their models show that nothing bad can result.

    Stop them before it is really too late!

  2. For the first time in recorded history, we had an ice storm in October. Made a mess. Trees still had leaves, so more surface area to accumulate ice. Trees down everywhere. Even though it pretty much ended Wednesday, still a lot of people without power here, and it’s going to take weeks, if not months to clean up all the downed trees. Place is going to not look the same with all the trees gone.

  3. The trigger for “Snowball Earth” global ice ages may have been drops in incoming sunlight that happened quickly, in geological terms, according to an MIT study.
    Image: Wikimedia, Oleg Kuznetsov

    The particular mechanisms that may have quickly darkened the skies over tens of thousands of years is still up for debate. One possibility is that widespread volcanoes may have spewed aerosols into the atmosphere, blocking incoming sunlight around the world. Another is that primitive algae may have evolved mechanisms that facilitated the formation of light-reflecting clouds. The results from this new study suggest scientists may consider processes such as these, that quickly reduce incoming solar radiation, as more likely triggers for Earth’s ice ages.
    *** ***
    I used to say “When the Sun Blinks, we will be cold meat”!
    Did anyone hear about Betelgeuse’s dimming? The scientists believe (Guess) that the star spewed a large cloud of material into space. However, is it possible that the star “Blinked”? Betelgeuse could go into a lower energy state for a period of time, yet I have no proof, nor do the “Scientists”!
    We are all aware of our Sun’s 11 years cycle of slightly higher and lower output, but could our Sun also have about a 12,000 year high energy cycle and around 100,000 year lower energy cycle? One thing we do know is the Ice Ages have been cycling like clockwork for about 3 million years.
    “But, what about CO2”, you say. My answer is see this: https://www.iceagenow.info/anyone-says-enduring-unprecedented-global-warming-lying-woefully-misinformed/
    As anyone can see, CO2 has been high and low, yet had little or no effect on temperature for millions of years!
    *** ***
    From: https://www.astrobio.net/alien-life/snowball-earths-triggered-by-plunge-in-incoming-sunlight/

    Scientists have considered multiple scenarios for what may have tipped the planet into each ice age. While no single driving process has been identified, it’s assumed that whatever triggered the temporary freeze-overs must have done so in a way that pushed the planet past a critical threshold, such as reducing incoming sunlight or atmospheric carbon dioxide to levels low enough to set off a global expansion of ice.
    But MIT scientists now say that Snowball Earths were likely the product of “rate-induced glaciations.” That is, they found the Earth can be tipped into a global ice age when the level of solar radiation it receives changes quickly over a geologically short period of time. The amount of solar radiation doesn’t have to drop to a particular threshold point; as long as the decrease in incoming sunlight occurs faster than a critical rate, a temporary glaciation, or Snowball Earth, will follow.
    These findings, published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society A, suggest that whatever triggered the Earth’s ice ages most likely involved processes that quickly reduced the amount of solar radiation coming to the surface, such as widespread volcanic eruptions or biologically induced cloud formation that could have significantly blocked out the sun’s rays. 
    The findings may also apply to the search for life on other planets. Researchers have been keen on finding exoplanets within the habitable zone — a distance from their star that would be within a temperature range that could support life. The new study suggests that these planets, like Earth, could also ice over temporarily if their climate changes abruptly. Even if they lie within a habitable zone, Earth-like planets may be more susceptible to global ice ages than previously thought.
    “You could have a planet that stays well within the classical habitable zone, but if incoming sunlight changes too fast, you could get a Snowball Earth,” says lead author Constantin Arnscheidt, a graduate student in MIT’s Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAPS). “What this highlights is the notion that there’s so much more nuance in the concept of habitability.”
    Arnscheidt has co-authored the paper with Daniel Rothman, EAPS professor of geophysics, and co-founder and co-director of the Lorenz Center.
    “Be wary of speed”
    The researchers developed a simple mathematical model of the Earth’s climate system that includes equations to represent relations between incoming and outgoing solar radiation, the surface temperature of the Earth, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, and the effects of weathering in taking up and storing atmospheric carbon dioxide. The researchers were able to tune each of these parameters to observe which conditions generated a Snowball Earth.
    Ultimately, they found that a planet was more likely to freeze over if incoming solar radiation decreased quickly, at a rate that was faster than a critical rate, rather than to a critical threshold, or particular level of sunlight. There is some uncertainty in exactly what that critical rate would be, as the model is a simplified representation of the Earth’s climate. Nevertheless, Arnscheidt estimates that the Earth would have to experience about a 2 percent drop in incoming sunlight over a period of about 10,000 years to tip into a global ice age.
    “It’s reasonable to assume past glaciations were induced by geologically quick changes to solar radiation,” Arnscheidt says.
    The particular mechanisms that may have quickly darkened the skies over tens of thousands of years is still up for debate. One possibility is that widespread volcanoes may have spewed aerosols into the atmosphere, blocking incoming sunlight around the world. Another is that primitive algae may have evolved mechanisms that facilitated the formation of light-reflecting clouds. The results from this new study suggest scientists may consider processes such as these, that quickly reduce incoming solar radiation, as more likely triggers for Earth’s ice ages.
    “Even though humanity will not trigger a snowball glaciation on our current climate trajectory, the existence of such a ‘rate-induced tipping point’ at the global scale may still remain a cause for concern,” Arnscheidt points out. “For example, it teaches us that we should be wary of the speed at which we are modifying Earth’s climate, not just the magnitude of the change. There could be other such rate-induced tipping points that might be triggered by anthropogenic warming. Identifying these and constraining their critical rates is a worthwhile goal for further research.”

  4. If Trump wins next week he can hold a gun to NOAA, NCDC etc etc and say simply: ‘Print the truth or You’re All Fired!’

    • Truthfully, Trump needs to fire the whole bunch and start over!
      Of course, Trump needs to fire most of the FBI, CIA, DOJ, and other swamp creatures!

  5. hmm yes the UHI
    which should have dropped quite a large amt as traffic heat was removed during covid
    in home heat/aircons throw a bit out but no as much as a hot car engine would i reckon, and peple without income sure couldnt be running much or either and pay the rent n eat
    heat/cool is the area you cut first to save bucks

    • “hmm yes the UHI which should have dropped quite a large amt as traffic heat was removed during covid”

      Quite a large amount? From traffic heat? I think not.
      All the heat produced by fuel consumption on a given day pales in comparison to solar irradiation.

      From Wikipedia (even warmists agree):
      “Vehicles and energy use are relatively minor contributors to UHI effect.”
      Also:
      The main cause of the urban heat island effect is from the modification of land surfaces.[1][2] Waste heat generated by energy usage is a secondary contributor.
      …dark surfaces absorb significantly more solar radiation, which causes urban concentrations of roads and buildings to heat more than suburban and rural areas during the day…
      materials … used in urban areas for pavement and roofs, such as concrete and asphalt, have significantly different thermal bulk properties … and surface radiative properties (albedo and emissivity) than the surrounding rural areas….
      …major reason is the lack of evapotranspiration (for example, through lack of vegetation) in urban areas…
      Other causes … UHI are due to geometric effects. The tall buildings within many urban areas provide multiple surfaces for the reflection and absorption of sunlight…called the “urban canyon effect”…blocking of wind, which also inhibits cooling by convection… etc.

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