Barents Sea warmer on the bottom than on the surface

“They would never mention underwater volcanoes, I guess..?” says reader.

“The Norwegian Met Office has posted an article about the heating of Barents Sea, being colder than average in the upper layers but unusually warm at the bottom,” says reader Flemming K. Sørensen in
Denmark . “They don’t know the reason, and guess it’s caused by warm water coming from the Atlantic Ocean. They would never mention underwater volcanoes, I guess..?”


Although surface water in the Barents Sea is colder than last year, it’s warmer at the bottom, says the article.

Temperature readings by Norwegian and Russian scientists done in conjunction with the annual ecosystem survey show that the Barents Sea is warmer at the bottom than last year, especially in the western parts, says Randi steward, head of IMR research on climate and fish.

The cause is not completely known, but “it is probably related to the supply and flow of warm Atlantic water to these areas (which) has been higher than usual.”

“(Or) is probably related to the large-scale wind field, such as trade winds, prevailing westerlies, polar jet stream and the east wind.

Luckily, the warmer water is not necessarily a threat to fish and marine mammals.

On the contrary, the Atlantic water is warm and rich in nutrients and plankton, thus providing better conditions for fish such as cod and capelin.

Of course there are also fish in the Barents Sea not so happy about it being warmer, “but it is hardly a threat to them.”

Southeast of the Barents Sea, one must return to the 1950s to find higher measured temperatures.

I don’t know if there are underwater volcanoes in the Barents Sea or not, but I think Mr. Sørensen is onto something. How else would you heat the bottom of the ocean before you heat the surface?

http://www.yr.no/nyheter/1.8345860

Thanks to Flemming K. Sørensen for this link


6 thoughts on “Barents Sea warmer on the bottom than on the surface”

  1. These so-calles scientists come up with two probable explanations: A) Warm water flowing from the Atlantic Ocean and B) large-scale warm wind fields. As I see it, A) warm water is lighter than cold water, so why would it sink? and B) warm winds will have some influence on the surface water, but will not heat up deep water. As warm water will rise because it is lighter than cold water, there must be a constant source of heating to keep it warm in the deep. I would not know any other source of heating up deep water than underwater volcanoes.

  2. Luckily, the warmer water is not necessarily a threat to fish and marine mammals.

    On the contrary, the Atlantic water is warm and rich in nutrients and plankton, thus providing better conditions for fish such as cod and capelin.

    oh thats funnier than they know!
    when aus water supposedly??? get a half degree warmer we have the warmists and uberstupid greenies going off that the reef will die the nutrient from farm chem is to blame.
    looking at ocean temps we havet Got any warming water, and the nutrient killing ocean grasses etc, is from??
    SEWAGE! it flows upward from syndney and other outfalls catches a currnet and follows the coastline.
    Marine fella I know has been trying for Years to get em to admit it.
    sth aus govt admitted it as fact decades ago.
    what riles me is the insistence that NO species may migrate , ever, unless its caused by us..
    natural pest outbreaks ocean or land could Never…be natural and allowed to progress as nature sees fit.
    oh no, we ??? have to save it /stop it. whatever as its ALWAYS OUR FAULT.
    sheesh
    survival of the fittest and the adaptive.

  3. Not sure if this applies here, as not many facts are given in the article, but we all know that the surface freezes first.

    “Water at ordinary temperatures contracts and increases in density as it is cooled, like most substances. But at about 4°C it reaches a maximum density and then decreases in density as it approaches the freezing point. This decrease in density is only about one part in 10,000 as it cools from 4°C to 0°C, but this is sufficient to cause the water near freezing to come to the top. The water further expands upon freezing, so that water freezes from the top down, and ice floats on water.”

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