Billings, Montana, breaks all-time snowfall record

And more is coming down again….

March 31, 2014 – For the first time since recording began in 1934, Billings has gone over 100 inches (254 cm) of snow in a single season.

Snowfall associated with a storm that began Sunday morning as rain, amounted to 1.4 inches, which brings the yearly total to 100.6 inches, said Tom Humphrey, a Meteorologist at the NWS in Billings….

More snow is expected on Wednesday and again on Friday.

In the meantime, several schools decided to cancel classes on Monday due to icy roads.
http://billingsgazette.com/news/local/billings-gets-inches-of-snow-this-winter/article_383 18afb-6dcc-5ffd-bd51-e4b5febf4419.html

http://billingsgazette.com/app/weather/forecast/

http://billingsgazette.com/news/state-and-regional/montana/schools-cancel-classes-monday-due-to-inclement-weather/article_3e88a6b6-94b6-5113-b349-7ab56abf548c.html

Thanks to Jeremy Ferkin for these links


5 thoughts on “Billings, Montana, breaks all-time snowfall record”

  1. The Winter from Hell has left Lake Superior with the thickest ice in decades and is delaying the start of the shipping season. The last shipping season came to an abrupt end and the local steel mill was forced to truck in raw materials instead of by the usual and much less expensive lake freighter method.

    At the western end of the big lake the ice breakers are having a bad time of it. One ice breaker broke down the very first day and had to return to port. The thick ice has now damaged shipping vessel(s) and these have returned to port. This is all highly unusual. -Greg

    Ships turn back after ice damage on Lake Superior

    March 28, 2014
    http://www.northlandsnewscenter.com/news/video/Two-ships-take-damage-from-ice-252980401.html

    Duluth, MN (NNCNOW.com) — The start of the 2014 shipping season has ground to a near halt by some of the worst lake ice in recent history.

    The Presque Isle freighter and the Morro Bay cutter have sustained damage and are being forced to return to the Twin Ports for repairs.

    Ships took off last week to try to make it to the Soo locks, planning to hug the shore to take advantage of the open water.

    A flotilla of US Coast Guard cutters has been working overtime to break ice and clear a path for those outbound ships.

    But ice four to five feet thick is still abundant on Lake Superior; in some places ridges of eight feet of ice have formed.
    And even though there is some open water, wind can blow the ice back into the channel.
    The Mackinaw along with the Katmai Bay and the Morro Bay were attempting to clear the way for the Presque Isle, which is carrying ore bound for the soo locks, which opened this week.
    However, both the Morro Bay and Presque Isle took some damage from the powerful ice.
    We don’t know how bad the damage is on either ship, but we do know that there is not any fuel leakage.

    Ice breakers challenged April 1, 2014

    http://www.miningjournal.net/page/content.detail/id/596524/Ice-breakers-challenged.html?nav=5006

    MARQUETTE – U.S. Coast Guard icebreakers challenged by Lake Superior ice as thick as six feet in some places are not expected to make it into Marquette Harbor for several days, delaying the local opening of the shipping season.

    “You’re not even on our radar,” Mark Dobson, vessel traffic controller for the Coast Guard’s Operation Taconite in Sault Ste. Marie, said Monday of Marquette’s ice-breaking prospects. “We can only imagine what that ice is like in Marquette right now.”

    Across Lake Superior, Coast Guard cutters were struggling Monday to break this winter’s tremendous ice cover, which on Lake Superior is the thickest it’s been in two decades.

  2. Snowfall measurements from the past winter storm that hit eastern Canada.

    NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR

    AWCN16 CWHX
    Weather summary for Newfoundland and Labrador issued by Environment Canada at 4:38 P.M. NDT Wednesday 2 April 2014.

    A low pressure system formed off the U.S. Eastern Seaboard on Sunday and tracked northeastward, spreading precipitation across the southern half of Newfoundland on Monday. The system then became very
    slow moving to the southeast of Nova Scotia, resulting in a prolonged period of strong northeasterly winds and a mix of snow, ice pellets
    and freezing rain for Southern Newfoundland.

    Areas such as the Southern Burin and Avalon peninsulas received precipitation mainly in the form of ice pellets and freezing rain, while areas further to the north such as St. John’s, Bay d’Espoir and the Burgeo Highway received primarily snow. The snowfall accumulations combined with strong winds to create reduced visibility in blowing snow and resulted in treacherous driving conditions in some areas. Many schools and businesses were closed in the St. John’s area on Tuesday and road closures were reported in areas of Southwestern Newfoundland due to the stormy conditions.

    Precipitation began to ease on Tuesday night as the storm moved eastward across the Southern Grand Banks.

    The following is a summary of weather event information received by Environment Canada.

    The following are unofficial snowfall totals as of 4:00 P.M.
    Wednesday: manned observation sites:
    St. John’s…………..37 cm (14.6″)
    Stephenville…………10 cm (3.9″)

    Unmanned observation sites:
    Argentia…………….35 cm* (13.8″)
    Burgeo………………33 cm* (13.0″)

    *snowfall amounts are estimated from water equivalent using a ratio of 1 centimetre snow to 1 millimetre water.

    Other unofficial observation sites:
    Seal cove, cbs……….40 cm (15.7″)
    Cowan heights………..40 cm (15.7″)
    Mount Carmel…………37 cm (14.6″)
    Bay Roberts………….30 cm (11.8″)
    Whitbourne…………..22 cm (8.7″)

    The following are unofficial maximum wind observations as of 4:00 P.M. Wednesday:
    Wreckhouse…………..135 km/h (83.9 mph)
    Cape pine……………113 km/h (70.2 mph)
    Burgeo………………111 km/h (69.0 mph)
    Sagona Island………..104 km/h (64.6 mph)
    St. Lawrence………….91 km/h (56.5 mph)
    Cape Race…………….91 km/h** (56.5 mph)
    St. John’s……………69 km/h (42.9 mph)

    **station stopped reporting at 5:30 P.M. Tuesday

    End

    ONTARIO

    AWCN12 CWTO
    Corrected weather summary for Northern Ontario issued by Environment Canada at 4:32 P.M. EDT Tuesday 1 April 2014.

    A cruel April fool’s joke has seemingly been played on Northwestern Ontario by mother nature. A fierce winter storm has pummeled the region with a colossal snowfall and pockets of freezing rain in some areas. Record snowfall amounts have been received in some locales including Sioux Lookout which received 47 cm (18.5″) yesterday alone beating the old daily record of 40.6 cm (16.0″) set on November 16 1941. The storm total in Sioux Lookout since early yesterday morning has reached an astounding 55 centimetres (21.7″). Also, Armstrong’s snow depth has surpassed 1 metre (39.4″+), as if to emphasize spring’s tentative start.

    The following is a summary of weather event information received by Environment Canada as of 2 P.M. EDT.

    Location………….estimated storm total snowfall

    Sioux Lookout……..55 centimetres (21.7″)
    Armstrong…………49 centimetres (19.3″)
    Dryden……………40 to 45 centimetres (15.7″ to 17.7″) as of 11 A.M. EDT.
    Pickle Lake……….30 centimetres (11.8″)

    Please note that this summary may contain preliminary or unofficial information and does not constitute a complete or final report.

    End

    QUEBEC

    AWCN11 CWUL
    Weather summary for Western Quebec issued by Environment Canada at 11:01 AM EDT Monday 31 March 2014.

    A storm over the American Eastern Seaboard brought a return of winter conditions in Southern and Central Quebec on Sunday. Some stretches of highway along the St Lawrence River were closed between Quebec
    City and the Gaspé Peninsula. The system continues to affect the Gaspé Peninsula.

    Below are the few snowfall accumulation reports received so far:

    Area…………………….amount (centimetres)

    Montréal (airport), from 3:30 AM to 2:00 P.M. on 03/30……………………15 (5.9″)
    napierville, from 3:30 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. on 03/30……………………10 (3.9″)
    Verchères, from 3:30 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. on 03/30………………10 to 15 (3.9″ to 5.9″)
    Saint-Jean-de-matha, from 3:30 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. on 03/30……………………13 (5.1″)
    Eastern Townships/Sherbrooke, from 3:30 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. on 03/30……….25 to 35 (9.8″ to 13.8″)
    Saint-Hyacinthe, from 3:30 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. on 03/30……………………12 (4.7″)
    Acton-Vale, from 3:30 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. on 03/30……………………11 (4.3″)
    Drummondville, from 3:30 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. on 03/30……………….8 to 10 (3.1″ to 3.9″)
    Shawinigan, from 4:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. on 03/30……………………23 (9.1″)
    Trois-Rivières, from 4:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. on 03/30………………10 to 15 (3.9″ to 5.9″)
    Charlesbourg, from 5:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. on 03/30……………………20 (7.9″)
    Quebec/mont-sainte-anne, from 5:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. on 03/30…………………14 (5.5″)
    Saint-Georges-de-Beauce, from 4:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. on 03/30……………15 to 25 (5.9″ to 9.8″)
    Montmagny, from 4:30 A.M. to 7:00 P.M. on 03/30………………15 to 25 (5.9″ to 9.8″)
    Kamouraska, from 4:30 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. on 03/30………………15 to 20 (5.9″ to 7.9″)
    Charlevoix, from 9:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. on 03/30………………15 to 20 (5.9″ to 7.9″)
    Témiscouata, from 7:00 A.M. to 10:00 P.M. on 03/30………………15 to 20 (5.9″ to 7.9″)
    Mont-Joli, from 1:00 P.M. on 03/30 to 10:00 A.M. on 03/31………………10 to 15 (3.9″ to 5.9″)
    Amqui, from 1:00 P.M. on 03/30 to 10:00 A.M. on 03/31………………15 to 20 (5.9″ to 7.9″)
    Restigouche, from 1:00 P.M. on 03/30 to 10:00 A.M. on 03/31……………20 to 30 (7.9″ to 11.8″)
    New-Carlisle, from 1:00 P.M. on 03/30 to 10:00 A.M. on 03/31……………25 to 35 (9.8″ to 13.8″)
    Parc de la Gaspésie, from 1:00 P.M. on 03/30 to 10:00 A.M. on 03/31….10 to 15 (3.9″ to 5.9″)
    Gaspé, from 1:00 P.M. on 03/30 to 10:00 A.M. on 03/31……………………34 (13.4″)

    However, areas near the New England border received mostly rain:

    Area…………………….amount (millimetres)

    Frelighsburg……………..22 (0.87″)
    Cowansville………………22 (0.87″)

    Lastly, strong to severe winds were observed along the St Lawrence River and on the Gaspé Peninsula:

    Area…………………….speed (km/h)

    Île d’Orleans, from 1:00 P.M. to 10:00 P.M. on 03/30………………85 to 89 (52.8 to 55.3 mph)
    ile-aux-grues, from 3:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M. on 03/30……………………80 (49.7 mph)

    Please note that this summary may include preliminary or unofficial data and does not constitute a final or an official report.

    End

    http://weather.gc.ca/warnings/weathersummaries_e.html

  3. now lets see some idiot say..Ah, but its old rotten ice..
    as they do for arctic ice 3ft and over.:-)

  4. This global warming has to be controlled. Its gotten so warm the lakes have frozen solid. I’m sure glad I studied so much “science” in school so I can understand how this all works. Its the evil corporations and 1% who froze the lakes. Isn’t “science” wonderful.

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