Is it too much to ask that warmists learn a little history?

Is it just me, or do the great storms of the past come across as by no means less impressive than what we see today?
– J. Hope

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Is it too much to ask that warmists learn a little history?

J. Hope

And I quote: “…when they find themselves in the path of a ridiculously powerful storm that may not have been anywhere near as devastating without human impacts, their rhetoric won’t count for much.”

(He’s quoting from iceagenow post “Tropical storm shocks scientists – Shatters record for lowest temperature on Earth.”)

Note the wonderful use of that universal cover-your-ass get-out word ‘may’. So how exactly do you *prove* that such storms are in fact worsened by ‘human impacts’?

For example, how would a warmist explain that in 1780, when the global human population was less than one billion, a hurricane killed more than 22,000 people in the Eastern Caribbean region?

Or that in 1274, when the population was considerably lower, 13,000 people died in a single typhoon in Japan?

Or that in the year 1737 a cyclone struck India from the Bay of Bengal and claimed the lives of some 300,000 while sinking 20,000 ships?

Or that in 1897, more than 170,000 people perished when cyclone and storm surges swept through East Pakistan?

If I’m jumping around in history here, it’s only because there are so, so many examples to choose from. I could go on and on. All this, and plenty more, long before the preachings of AGW ever took a hold on the irrational minds of the gullible.

Now compare that to the 1,880 deaths from one of the worst disasters of modern times, Hurricane Katrina, which was as much a phenomenon of human mismanagement as it was of the ravages of nature.

Is it just me, or do the great storms of the past come across as by no means less impressive than what we see today?

And is it too much to ask that these warmists should learn a little history, instead of merely banging their tired old drum?


8 thoughts on “Is it too much to ask that warmists learn a little history?”

    • yes lose funding/ media status/be shown to fools they really are/trillions in boondoggles would be halted/and quite a few million VERY irate people as the reality hits home n they realise theyve been had BIGTIME!
      made life decisions that are utterly without sane reason etc
      thats WHY the recent push to “dont talk science facts/talk EMOTIONS tell stories to encourage the mindset required without PROOF required

  1. The Romney Marsh is where I spent some of my formative years & I became very familiar with its history. Storms raged in 1236, 1250, 1252, 1271, 1287 and 1288 with the two disastrous storms in 1287 having the greatest impact. The River Rother changed course during the first storm & transformed the fortunes of Rye & New Romney. https://theromneymarsh.net/storm1287

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_England_flood_of_February_1287

    The second storm killed many thousands in North Germany & what is now the Netherlands.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Lucia%27s_flood

    After this flood, the Thames Barrier was constructed.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Sea_flood_of_1953#Britain

  2. I’ve been on the coming ice age train for about 20 years now, so I’m very far from being a “warmist”. Having said that, comparing death tolls due to storms that happened in the distant past is ridiculous and disingenuous. There were no early warning systems for storms back then and death tolls were correspondingly higher.

    • I think his point is to highlight not the death totals, but that storms raged long before mankind’s industrial revolution or millions of cars rolled the earth.

  3. Freeman Dyson once mentioned how the 2010 earthquakes in Haiti and Chile had disproportionate death tolls; as in, the Haiti earthquake was much weaker but killed hundreds of thousands because of non-existent building codes, while Chile’s architecture is made to withstand most earthquakes. If you really want to save people from natural disasters, then lift them out of poverty.

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