New Zealand skiers and snowboarders frothing with joy

“After last year’s epic ‘record-breaking’ snowfalls, looks like Nature’s out to better herself yet again!” says reader. “All of us New Zealand snowboarders – and skiers – are frothing with joy.”

“Places on the North Island’s east coast, which rarely get snow, are now digging themselves out of 1+ metre snowdrifts. And just when the media were talking-up summer’s arrival . . . d’oh!”

MetService said the weather was so bad it had not been able to measure the snow’s exact depth, but estimated at least 70 cm (28 inches), with snowdrifts of more than 1m (39 inches) in places.

The heavy snow knocked out power to 40,000 properties.

Snow down to 400 meters in places is expected for southern Gisborne from tonight.

http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/310277/polar-blast-cuts-power-to-thousands

Thanks to Greg Salmond for this link


6 thoughts on “New Zealand skiers and snowboarders frothing with joy”

  1. better herself again…frothing with joy…Let’s just positive-spin people into their graves.

    Sorry for the pessimism. I woke up cranky.

    • If you’re a winter sports enthusiast, there’s nothing like reports of fresh powder to get your happy on. A lot of them travel between hemispheres each year to continuously engage in their preferred sport. A lot more would enjoy it if places in Europe and the western U.S. had ski-quality snow on the slopes year-round.

  2. Lesotho Sees Its Heaviest Snowfall in Two Decades
    August 6, 2016
    The heaviest snow in two decades blanketed Lesotho in late July 2016. The storm prompted the airlifts of at least eight tourists, and caused the deaths of several shepherds in the Joe Gqabi District Municipality, according to news reports.
    It was the heaviest snow since 1996, said Stefan Grab, a professor at the University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa). Twenty years ago, the snow would have lasted as long as a week in places. This year, he said, snow at altitudes at or below 1800 meters (roughly 5,900 feet) melted within a day or two.
    “This particular snowfall was an extreme event, but it’s only extreme in the context that we haven’t had something like this in a long time,” said Grab. “In the first half of the 20th century, or certainly in the 19th century, these were very common.”
    Lesotho’s winters tend to be short, usually beginning in June and ending in early August. The hilly, landlocked kingdom, surrounded on all sides by South Africa, is comparable to Maryland in size.
    “If you are a herd boy who was born sometime since 1996, you would not have encountered such an extreme snowfall,” said Grab. “You wouldn’t be accustomed to it or prepared.”
    http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=88509
    http://eoimages.gsfc.nasa.gov/images/imagerecords/88000/88509/lesotho_tmo_2016209_lrg.jpg
    http://eoimages.gsfc.nasa.gov/images/imagerecords/88000/88509/lesotho_tmo_2016215_lrg.jpg

  3. “After last year’s epic ‘record-breaking’ snowfalls, looks like Nature’s out to better herself yet again!” says reader. “All of us New Zealand snowboarders – and skiers – are frothing with joy.”
    Brilliant!

  4. Update on NZ’s ‘hottest’ snow season: dang it’s cold!
    8 – 8 – 16 Lots of pics of snow-covered roads & farms, power lines down, ski area huts buried, happy snowboarders & skiers flocking to the hills for freshies (it is mid-winter after all). In these parts of the southern hemisphere we blame it on global warming™ “residual fallout powder” aka God’s dandruff.

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/82918168/live-snow-settles-across-the-country-black-ice-warnings-hundreds-without-power

    Imagine that: cold set to continue…

    http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/310381/snow-causes-power-woes-and-cold-set-to-continue

Comments are closed.