Scotland – Winter deaths highest in 30 years

“The number of people who died in Scotland over the winter months was the highest in more than 30 years, according to official figures.”

There were 17,771 deaths registered in the first three months of this year – 2,060 more than in the same period of 2017 and the highest since 1986.

See more:
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-scotland-politics-44468655

Thanks to Jay Hope for this link

“Even the old BBC had to give this a mention, although they are trying to fudge it by mentioning other health issues,” says Jay.


2 thoughts on “Scotland – Winter deaths highest in 30 years

  1. other health issues may well bepresent but being unable to afford heating or food or to be able to get outside and move and get some vitD would also be large factors
    with so many of the boomer gen hitting the 60 to 80 ages now its not looking good for many, especially the frailer ones.
    even if weve managed to remain fairly healthy0 were faced with bankster frauds n govts wrecking incomes from super, low pensions, scatty health access for many also unless your’e in the termite mounds of a city.
    as ever the better off will be ok, and heaven help the poorer ones -bluecollar and the widows/ers on annuities.

  2. The number and percentage of deaths is not a particularly useful piece of information, compared to death rates. Death rates are the number of deaths divided by the population (and in cases where the cause of death can be age related it’s important touse age-specific or age adjusted rates for comparisons). Death rates are the only thing that should be used for comparisons of this type, unless the population is completely stable, which is highly unlikely. The reason is when there are more people in a place or time, the number of deaths could be higher due to higher number of people even if the death rates are lower.

    Mind you… I spend 15 years of my career analyzing death data.

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