More snow for Canada

Winter storm and blizzard warnings for Nunavut and the east coast of Canada.

NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR

Winter storm warnings for the Bay of Exploits, Bonavista North, Bonavista Peninsula, Buchans and the interior, Clarenville and vicinity, Gander and vicinity, Grand Falls-Windsor and vicinity and Terra Nova regions and blizzard warnings for the Green Bay – White Bay and Northern Peninsula East regions.

Snowfall amounts reaching 15 centimetres (5.9″) combined with strong east to northeasterly winds gusting to 80 km/h (49.7 mph) will give reduced visibilities in blowing snow.”

NOVA SCOTIA

Winter storm warnings for the entire province.

General snowfall amounts of 15 to 20 centimetres (5.9″ to 7.9″) are expected over most areas with amounts likely reaching 25 to 35 centimetres (9.8″ to 13.8″) over central and eastern Nova Scotia, Cape Breton and eastern Prince Edward Island by Wednesday evening. Strong north to northeast winds will develop overnight and Wednesday and may gust as high as 80 km/h (49.7 mph) giving significantly reduced visibility in blowing snow.”

NUNAVUT

Blizzard warnings continue for the Arviat, Baker Lake, Chesterfield Inlet, Rankin Region including Whale Cove and Repulse Bay regions.

Severe blizzard conditions continue at Chesterfield Inlet, Baker Lake, Rankin Inlet, Whale Cove Inlet, and Arviat with northwesterly wind gusts in excess of 90 km/h (55.9 mph). Similar conditions will prevail throughout the evening as winds remain strong.

Blizzard warning continues for the Cambridge Bay region.

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

Winter storm warnings for the Kings County and Queens County regions.

General snowfall amounts of 15 to 20 centimetres (5.9″ to 7.9″) are expected over most areas with amounts likely reaching 25 to 35 centimetres (9.8″ to 13.8″) over central and eastern Nova Scotia, Cape Breton and eastern Prince Edward Island by Wednesday evening. Strong north to northeast winds will develop overnight and Wednesday and may gust as high as 80 km/h (49.7 mph) giving significantly reduced visibility in blowing snow.”

http://weather.gc.ca/warnings/index_e.html

Thanks to Terry Homeniuk for this link


4 thoughts on “More snow for Canada

  1. Snowstorm drops up to 50 cm in parts of Atlantic Canada (with video)
    Halifax almost entirely shut down, with motorists urged to stay off roads. Posted: Mar 18, 2015
    For the second time in three days a large storm is battering parts of Atlantic Canada with snow and high winds, with up to 50 centimetres of snow reported in some regions of Nova Scotia.
    Halifax is almost completely shut down, with all transit pulled off the roads and government buildings and universities closed for the day. Environment Canada is warning that large swaths of the province could be hit by near-zero visibility conditions.
    The storm is causing problems for emergency crews, and one Halifax fire truck was stuck in a snow bank for an hour on the way to a call.
    Police and municipal officials are urging drivers to stay off the roads to let plows manoeuvre. Nova Scotia RCMP say there are at least 50 vehicles stranded on roads and highways.
    “We have a large number of vehicles stuck and motorists stranded on the road and it’s very bad out there,” RCMP Sgt. Al LeBlanc says.
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/snowstorm-drops-up-to-50-cm-in-parts-of-atlantic-canada-1.2999430

  2. Snowfall amounts for Nova Scotia from today.

    NOVA SCOTIA

    AWCN11 CWHX
    Weather summary for Nova Scotia issued by Environment Canada at 4:51 P.M. ADT Wednesday 18 March 2015.

    A vigourous low pressure system developed over Central Canada on Tuesday and intensified as it tracked just off the Atlantic Coast of Nova Scotia. Heavy snow, blowing snow, and high winds accompanied this system. General amounts were in the 30 to 60 centimetre (11.8″ to 23.6″) range however there is one unconfirmed report of 75+ centimetres (29.5″+) in the Halifax region.

    The following is a summary of snowfall amounts and maximum wind gusts received by Environment Canada as of 3:00 P.M. ADT Wednesday March 18, 2015.

    Please note that this summary contains preliminary or unofficial information and does not constitute a complete or final report. In some cases snowfall amounts have been estimated.

    Snowfall – wind gust
    (centimetres) – (km/h)

    Airport observation sites

    Yarmouth – 10 (3.9″) 89 (55.3 mph)
    Greenwood – 20 (7.9″) 63 (39.1 mph)
    Halifax international – 41 (16.1″) 56 (34.8 mph)
    Sydney – 12 (4.7″) 72 (44.7 mph)

    Automated observation sites
    (snowfall estimated based on 10:1 liquid ratio)

    Shearwater – 27 (10.6″)
    Kentville – 17 (6.7″)
    Eskasoni – 10 (3.9″)
    Baccaro Point – 7 (2.8″)
    Caribou Point – 7 (2.8″)

    Unofficial observations received early in the day:

    Springfield – 27 (10.6″)
    Duncans Cove – 29 (11.4″)
    Sackville – 50-60 (19.7″ to 23.6″)
    Bedford – 52 (20.5″)
    Hammonds Plains – 54 (21.3″)
    Fall River – 43 (16.9″)
    Rawdon gold mines – 41 (16.1″)
    Enfield – 38 (15.0″)
    Truro – 19 (7.5″)

    END

    http://weather.gc.ca/warnings/weathersummaries_e.html

  3. The snow is still hanging around on the Canadian east coast.

    NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR

    Winter storm warnings for the Cartwright to Black Tickle and Norman Bay to Lodge Bay regions.

    “Snow is forecast to spread over southeastern Labrador overnight into early Thursday as a low pressure system tracks across southeastern Newfoundland. The snow will be heavy at times, giving amounts between 15 and 20 centimetres (5.9″ to 7.9″) by late Thursday afternoon, and additional accumulations of 5 to 10 centimetres (2.0″ to 3.9″) Thursday night. Strengthening northerly winds gusting up to 80 km/h (49.7 mph) will accompany the snow creating blowing snow and reduced visibilities. Conditions are expected to improve early Friday as the low moves away.”

    Blizzard warnings continue for the Green Bay – White Bay and Northern Peninsula East regions.

    “Snow, at times heavy will continue tonight, easing somewhat on Thursday. By overnight Thursday night, total snowfall accumulations are forecast to range from 20 centimetres (7.9″) near St. Anthony to up to 30 centimetres (11.8″) over the Baie Verte Peninsula. Additionally, winds gusting to 90 km/h (55.9 mph) will greatly reduce visibilities in blowing snow tonight and Thursday morning. Blowing snow is forecast to persist into Thursday night.”

    NOVA SCOTIA

    Winter storm warnings continue for the Antigonish County, Colchester County – Cobequid Bay, Colchester County North, Cumberland County – Minas Shore, Cumberland County North and Cobequid Pass, Guysborough County, Inverness County – Mabou and north, Inverness County – south of Mabou, Pictou County, Richmond County, Sydney Metro and Cape Breton County and Victoria County regions.

    “An intensifying low pressure system south of Newfoundland this evening will move northeastward away from the Maritimes tonight. Snow at times heavy will persist tonight before gradually tapering to flurries early Thursday morning. Further snowfall amounts ranging from 5 to 20 centimetres (2.0″ to 7.9″) are expected bringing total amounts for this storm to 40 to 70 centimetres (15.7″ to 27.6″). Strong north to northwest winds in the wake of the system with gusts as high as 80 km/h (49.7 mph) will give significantly reduced visibilities in blowing snow tonight and into Thursday.”

    PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

    Winter storm warnings continue for the Kings County and Queens County regions.

    “An intensifying low pressure system south of Newfoundland this evening will move northeastward away from the Maritimes tonight. Snow at times heavy will persist tonight before gradually tapering to flurries early Thursday morning. Further snowfall amounts ranging from 5 to 20 centimetres (2.0″ to 7.9″) are expected bringing total amounts for this storm to 40 to 70 centimetres (15.7″ to 27.6″). Strong north to northwest winds in the wake of the system with gusts as high as 80 km/h (49.7 mph) will give significantly reduced visibilities in blowing snow tonight and into Thursday.”

    http://weather.gc.ca/warnings/index_e.html

  4. The snow just keeps piling up in Nova Scotia.

    NOVA SCOTIA

    AWCN11 CWHX
    Weather summary for Nova Scotia issued by Environment Canada at 10:02 A.M. ADT Thursday 19 March 2015.

    A vigourous low pressure system developed over Central Canada on Tuesday and intensified as it tracked just off the Atlantic Coast of Nova Scotia. Heavy snow, blowing snow, and high winds accompanied this system. Volunteer reports were as high as 75 cm (29.5″).

    The following is a summary of snowfall amounts and maximum wind gusts received by Environment Canada as of 10:00 A.M. ADT Thursday March 19, 2015.

    Please note that this summary contains preliminary or unofficial information and does not constitute a complete or final report. In some cases snowfall amounts have been estimated.

    Snowfall – wind gust
    (centimetres) (km/h)

    Airport observation sites

    Yarmouth – 11 (4.3″) 89 (55.3 mph)
    Greenwood – 37 (14.6″) 63 (39.1 mph)
    Halifax international – 48 (18.9″) 56 (34.8 mph)
    Sydney – 24 (9.4″) 76 (47.2″)

    Automated observation sites
    (snowfall estimated based on 10:1 liquid ratio)

    Shearwater – 27 (10.6″)
    Kentville – 21 (8.3″)
    Eskasoni – 12 (4.7″)
    Baccaro Point – 7 (2.8″)
    Ingonish – 14 (5.5″)
    Upper Stewiacke – 18 (7.1″)

    Unofficial observations:

    Aspy Bay – 32 (12.6″)
    Bedford – 63 (24.8″)
    Duncans Cove – 41 (16.1″)
    Enfield – 50 (19.7″)
    Fall River – 55 (21.7″)
    George River – 25 (9.8″)
    Hammonds Plains – 74 (29.1″)
    HMC dockyard – 52 (20.5″)
    Port Williams – 27 (10.6″)
    Truro – 42 (16.5″)
    Wolfville – 45 (17.7″)

    END

    http://weather.gc.ca/warnings/weathersummaries_e.html

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