Study shows how plants adapt to rising carbon dioxide

Some drier conifer forests are acclimating two to three times faster than wetter, conifer forests.

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16 Aug 2019 – Studies of the world’s tropical forests pinpoint how much water plants put back into the atmosphere compared to how much carbon they take up.

Depending on how efficiently plants use water, researchers from and the University of California have determined that some drier conifer forests are acclimating two to three times faster to rising CO2 levles than wetter, conifer forests, meaning they are more efficient in their water use. Lower rainfall is linked to that increased efficiency, which helps explain why some regions in the Amazon are drying out faster than others.

The study showed that over the last century, leguminous trees—or trees that produce seeds in pods—on average used water more efficiently than non-legumes.

The article says this new research could be used to improve current and long-term rainfall predictions, and that it has implications for how water is stored and used in areas where plants put less water back into the atmosphere.

Does this mean more attempts at land control? We’ll see.

See entire article:
https://phys.org/news/2019-08-forest-carbon-dioxide.html?fbclid=IwAR3ytIRMfbs6atunZ916tUAiiPdp2MsF7Hm6pW3iaJdusJWVHeCXPJLRJFE

Thanks to Gabriel Rychert for this link


2 thoughts on “Study shows how plants adapt to rising carbon dioxide”

  1. stick a gumtree in dryland it grows slowy with less leaf
    same plant from same batch in a wet spot will go nuts and be lush
    so what exactly thats new did they find?
    not much if anything
    but it got em a yr or more pay/grants ongoing you betcha!

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