Tropical Storm Hanna Slowly Moving Toward Texas

RAINFALL: Hanna is expected to produce 3 to 5 inches of rain with isolated maximum totals of 10 inches through Monday along the Gulf Coast of the United States from Louisiana to south Texas, and inland to the Mexican states of Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, and northern Tamaulipas. This rain may result in life-threatening flash flooding, rapid rises on small streams, and isolated minor to moderate river flooding.

NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL AL082020
100 AM CDT Fri Jul 24 2020

…HANNA CONTINUES MOVING SLOWLY WEST-NORTHWESTWARD TOWARD TEXAS…

LOCATION…ABOUT 360 MI…575 KM ESE OF CORPUS CHRISTI TEXAS
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS…40 MPH…65 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT…WNW OR 285 DEGREES AT 7 MPH…11 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE…1002 MB…29.59 INCHES

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for… * Mouth of the Rio Grande to San Luis Pass Texas

A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for… * San Luis Pass to High Island Texas

A Tropical Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area within 36 hours.

A Tropical Storm Watch means that tropical storm conditions are possible within the watch area, generally within 48 hours.

Interests along the Texas and Louisiana coast should monitor the progress of this system.

… the center of the storm is expected to move across the northwestern Gulf of Mexico today and tonight, and make landfall along the Texas coast on Saturday.

Maximum sustained winds are near 40 mph (65 km/h) with higher gusts. Additional strengthening is expected until the system makes landfall. Steady weakening is expected after Hanna moves inland.

SURF: Swells generated by Hanna are expected to increase and affect much of the Texas and Louisiana coasts during the next few days. These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions. Please consult products from your local weather office.

See entire bulletin:
https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/text/refresh/MIATCPAT3+shtml/232046.shtml


7 thoughts on “Tropical Storm Hanna Slowly Moving Toward Texas”

  1. So what I’ve seen much worse than that! Harvey produced over 50 inches of rainfall in 2017.

    • Even more impressive was TS Claudette, which struck the same area of Houston, Alvin, back in July (25-26) 1979. Dumped 43 in in 24 hours. Still the standing 24 hr rainfall total for the CONUS. It took Harvey 4 days to pull that off.

      Of course, the other major issue w/ Houston is subsidence.

      Area East of Downtown Houston – 10 ft. Here’s the article followed by the graphic. Our media never shared this with the public during/after Harvey. That’s because they are agenda driven liars.

      ” . . according to United States Geological Survey data, approximately 4,700 square miles of land in and near Baytown and Pasadena sank by at least six feet between the years 1943 and 1973. ”

      https://secureservercdn.net/198.71.233.21/c40.649.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/TLP_Map127_HoustonSubsidence1_2015_06_12.jpg

  2. While much of our society has drunk the kool aid of the virus, BLM, global warming, etc., few are paying attention to the real danger at our doorstep, the Grand Solar Minimum. Mother nature will restore balance in its own way! Unfortunately, since we are so arrogant in our inability to see what’s in front of us, humans will pay a steep price!

  3. San Luis Pass is the west end of Galveston Island. High Island is near the Beaumont/Port Arthur area, so it’s basically the entire coastal area of TX under tropical storm warnings.

    Looks like it’s time to start monitoring Space city weather.com again.

  4. Just checked the weather. Looks like the eye will come in at Corpus Christi. We got some bands of rain yesterday, sudden gust of wind with short heavy rainfall. Lived thru Harvey and Allison, so not too worried about this one. We are near Houston.

  5. I’ve notice that all of this hurricane news focuses on Texas, specifically, the lowest portion of the state. Right beside this narrow piece of land is Mexico, yet none of the news items seem to mention that country, which will get most of the foul weather compared to Texas. Why, I ask. Might it be because Trump can’t be blamed for Mexican bad weather?

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